How to Make Burrata Cheese at Home!!

A couple of weeks ago I decided I needed a good food project. Something I had never made before, something that would teach me a new skill, something that would challenge me and something that would end in a delicious meal. I decided to try to make my own Burrata Cheese. Burrata is a cheese made with an outer shell of Mozzarella Cheese and filled with a mixture of torn Mozzarella curds and heavy cream. The center should look like creamy cottage cheese when you cut into it.

My friend Joe, a very talented chef and writer of The Chronicles of Oui, came over and along with the Boy we set out to make Burrata. We used the recipe “30-Minute Mozzarella” using the hot whey method, as opposed to the microwave from the wonderful, must-have cheese making book, Home Cheese Making-Recipes for 75 Homemade Cheeses by the talented Ricki Carroll, founder of the New England Cheesemaking Supply Company.

Here it is, in pictures:

Burrata Mise en Place: 1.5 teaspoons citric acid dissolved in cold water, .25 rennet tablet dissolved in a quarter cup cold water, 1 gallon good quality NOT Ultra High Pasturized Milk (heavy cream not pictured)

Burrata Mise en Place: 1.5 teaspoons citric acid dissolved in cold water, .25 rennet tablet dissolved in a quarter cup cold water, 1 gallon good quality NOT Ultra High Pasturized Milk (heavy cream not pictured)

 

Bring the milk up to 55 degrees and stir in citric acid solution.

Bring the milk up to 55 degrees and stir in citric acid solution.

Heat milk to 90 degrees, stirring constantly. When milk reaches 90 degrees stir in rennet and lit pot sit for 5 minutes.

Heat milk to 90 degrees, stirring constantly. When milk reaches 90 degrees stir in rennet and lit pot sit for 5 minutes.

Curds will have separated from the whey, cut into a cubes.

Curds will have separated from the whey, cut into a cubes.

 

Place Pot back on heat and warm curds up to 105 degrees.

Place Pot back on heat and warm curds up to 105 degrees.

Stir curds for 2 minutes

Stir curds for 2 minutes

 

 

Scoop Curds off of whey. Separate 25% of curds for filling.

Scoop Curds off of whey. Separate 25% of curds for filling.

Heat whey to 175 degrees,  Add .25 cup of salt to the whey. Shape the curds into golf ball size balls, dip into the hot whey and knead the curds for several seconds until the curd is smooth and elastic.

Heat whey to 175 degrees, Add .25 cup of salt to the whey. Shape the curds into golf ball size balls, dip into the hot whey and knead the curds for several seconds until the curd is smooth and elastic.

Take the reserved curds and roll them between your fingers until the curds resemble rice.

Take the reserved curds and roll them between your fingers until the curds resemble rice.

 

Mix half a cup of heavy cream with the mozzarella "rice".

Mix half a cup of heavy cream with the mozzarella “rice”.

Back to Mozzarella, flatten curds as thin as possible.

Back to Mozzarella, flatten curds as thin as possible.

 

Fill flattened mozzarella with as much filling as you can. Pinch into a ball.

Fill flattened mozzarella with as much filling as you can. Pinch into a ball.

 

 

Dip Burrata Ball into hot whey.

Dip Burrata Ball into iced water to seal, and store in cooled whey. Burrata is best immediately but will keep 24 hours.

 

 

The Boy and I at work.

The Boy and I at work.

 

 

 

I seared some asparagus, tossed with a warm lemon-anchovy vinaigrette and let the balls of burrata melt a little.

I seared some asparagus, tossed with a warm lemon-anchovy vinaigrette and let the balls of burrata melt a little. Totes Delishy!!

 

Final Product

Final Product

 

Also an extra big Happy Birthday to my beautiful sister who turns 30 today and is a huge supporter of Totes! I love you, I miss you and I couldn’t ask for a better big sis! Have a rad birthday!taytin

10 thoughts on “How to Make Burrata Cheese at Home!!

  1. I’m really enjoying the design and layout of your site. It’s a very easy on the eyes
    which makes it much more enjoyable for me to come here and visit
    more often. Did you hire out a developer to create your theme?
    Outstanding work!

    • I like farmers mktears, although a truck farm stand opened down the street that is just selling produce at lower prices than the supermarkets even. Most of their produce is shipped in but they do buy local during the season and to pay half the supermarket rate and a quarter of the organic farmer’s market rate is too tempting for most purchases. They have just awesome prices on water, Tuscan, and Honey Dew mellons. I think the term “organic” is way overrated in itself (the quality difference between organic and regular produce is marginal at best), but I am willing to pay more (organic prices) for truly local produce I cannot grow myself. Becuase getting fruits and veggies the same day from the field is just amazing.

  2. Hi there just wanted to give you a quick heads up
    and let you know a few of the images aren’t loading properly. I’m not sure why but I think its a linking issue.
    I’ve tried it in two different web browsers and both show the same outcome.

  3. Joe is right about the difference beeetwn large curd and small curd(which is pretty much ricotta). However, I can address the other part of your question.Traditionally, ricotta is made from the whey waste from making a hard cheese. The whey is reheated and acid is added, causing whatever protein is left to coagulate into ricotta, so nothing is wasted. If you do the same thing with whole milk(heat it and add acid) the same thing will happen to the protein, there is just much more of the protein to coagulate so you get more cheese out of it. It’s not traditional to make ricotta out of whole milk, but the product is the same, and it’s much easier and more convenient than making large wheels of hard cheese to get some ricotta!!

    • Exactly! You CAN buy ricotta con latte in some places, which is ricotta made from milk and not the leftover whey. It’s insanely creamy and smooth, and I agree, way easier than using the whey!

  4. Amy Feb 28, 2008 – Rebecca, your blog looks great! So I have a question for you: When I pump my own milk and let it sit in the frdige and it separates, is the stuff at the bottom also whey? Can I use it to ferment beans and such? Wadda you think?

    • Whey occurs after fermentation or the introduction of acid and I believe there are two types of whey (acid and sweet). Any fluids that separate out of milk will be something different.

      If you make kefir or yogurt, that whey is ideal for soaking and sprouting grains, flours, and seeds. The whey from cheese-making is still useful, but I’ve only use it for ricotta.

      Unless processed in some way, the fluid that separates out is not whey.

    • Um. That’s just skim milk and cream. Milk that you buy at the store is homogenized, so it doesn’t separate. If you get it straight from the farmer it will separate into cream and milk. When we used to get milk from my aunt’s dairy, over an eighth of the 4 gallon jar would be separated cream (we’d scoop off most of it and the remaining milk would still be richer than whole – after shaking to reincorporate the remaining cream).

  5. Thanks for that recipe, i am going to try that this week end :-) Quick question… I assume the temperatures you mention are fahrenheit?

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